New Comic Book Day 11: The Four Issues

Please check out my previous Storytelling posts here.  And my 365 Reviews here.

It’s Wednesday!  That means four new #1s that dropped today, reviewed for your pleasure…lots of Marvel and DC flooding the #1 market today, so one snuck into my mix despite my best efforts to not review Big Two titles.  And in the sea of selections today, I went with Black Panther Vs. Deadpool; I’m a fan of Kibblesmith, and the art of Ricardo Lopez Ortiz is pretty dope in this issue.

Let’s start there:

Black Panther Vs. Deadpool from Marvel Comics

Written by Daniel Kibblesmith; Illustrated by Richardo Lopez Ortiz; Colored by Felipe Sobreiro

This is a fun issue, but make no mistake…you know exactly what you’re getting.  Even Deadpool, in the issue states, “First, we’re going to have a small misunderstanding.  Then, there’s a big fight.  Then some mutual threat will show up, and that’ll be the real villain, so we’ll put aside our differences for a classic Marvel Team-Up and work together to take down the bad guy.”

Yep.  Issue two is going to be called “A Big Fight.”  But if that’s what you expect, you’ll dig this.  It is funny, and the art of Ricardo Lopez Ortiz is slick and worth checking out.  As I mentioned earlier, the art of the book sold me in the sea of other Big Two stuff this week…and the writing of Kibblesmith, whom I dug from his writing on Lockjaw.

 

Dead Kings from Aftershock

Written by Steve Orlando; Illustrated by Matthew Dow Smith; Colored by Lauren Affe

This book takes place in a world seemingly devastated by mechs and war, and there is a guy attempting to save his brother from a prison to play out a promise that he made to his mother, but other than that, and a testicle bomb, this one’s a mystery.  Yes, he put replaced one of his testicles with an explosive to blow open the place his brother is being kept.  I’d like to believe there would be a less intrusive place for a bomb.

Back in the day, I tried reading the Magic The Gathering novels.  I quickly gave up because the names of the people and places were too ridiculous for me.  Humans, at times, to toss to many consonants or vowels together, and without a pad and pen to help me keep track, I get frustrated and stop reading.

I know many of you are not like that; however, I am.  And this book is packed with unique names of people and places that I had a hard time getting behind.  On top of that, the way in which the history of the world and characters is dropped plays convoluted to me.  Just give me some plot.  I’m sure we are building the world here, and in a couple of issues, it’ll all build up, but there are a lot of issues dropping each week, and this one will not make my pull list.

But I’m sure this title will become a board game with 5,000 pieces where factions struggle for survival in the shadows of fallen bests.  If you are confused by my take on this issue, it’s cool…so am I.  But the title is cool, and I can see this cover on a board game.

 

The Whispering Dark from Dark Horse Comics

Written by Christofer Emgard; Illustrated by Tomas Aira

Soldiers in a foreign land with no supplies attempt to trek across some mountains in enemy territory in order to survive.

This issue is bookended by scenes of a preacher father and his daughter (that we are to believe was one of the soldiers) as they discuss war and murder.

The world is possibly the not-so-distant future; the soldiers take pills to ramp up their emotions and skills.  Other than that, not much of it reads as futuristic.  The reader is tossed into a desolate place as they watch a group of six soldiers survive.

Art and writing are OK.  But not much happens here to hook the reader.  This feels like a lot of stuff that has come out over the past couple of years.

 

Judge Dredd from IDW

Written by Paul Jenkins; Illustrated by Marco Castiello, assisted by Vincenzo Acunzo; Colored by Jason Millet

My Best of the Four this week comes from IDW in the form of a classic character that’s back on the shelves: Judge Dredd.

I’m not well-versed in the Dredd; I’ve read a couple of the comics, and I’ve seen the films (which I dug), but my overall exposure to Dredd is not as great as some; however, I dug this book.  It’s timely and interesting without being convoluted.

Basic premise: Judge Dredd patrols Mega-City One, a futuristic, dirty city of about 800 million.  Under the city is a place called the Spillover.  The Spillover consists of mutant outcasts that process the waste from Mega-City One.  Inhabitants have developed and mutated to live in the toxic waste, and for the most part, they manage themselves and survive without much hassle.

BUT a corner’s report of a mutated-free Spillover inhabitant revels an alien parasite that threatens to throw the two societies into havoc, and the Judges must keep the peace.

It’s a cool book that even takes the time to toss a jab at our president:

I dig it.  It’s an original spin on a concept that is engaging yet usually overdone.  Check this one out!

 

At the end of these posts, I’m keeping a running list of the “Best of the Four” publisher wins!  Here you go.  Eleven weeks in…IDW scores point 2!

BOOM! Studios: 2

Image: 3

Archie Comics: 1

Dark Horse Comics: 1

Marvel: 1

IDW: 2

Vault: 1

Shout out to my shop, Alternate Reality located at 111th and Kedzie in beautiful Downtown Mt. Greenwood, Chicago…where I get all of my new books.  Check them out if you are in the Chicagoland area.  Tell Tim that Eric sent ya!

Happy reading!

Eric

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